Tag: Jonamagashi

My recommended 3 cafes in Tokyo where you can enjoy Matcha and high-grade Japanese sweets

My recommended 3 cafes in Tokyo where you can enjoy Matcha and high-grade Japanese sweets

In Tokyo there are many cafes you can have a delicious cup of Matcha , but there are only a few cafes where you can have Matcha together with high-grade Wagashi. Let me introduce you 3 cafes I recommend you to visit in Tokyo!(*´∀`*)

 

1. Tsuruya Yoshinobu, TOKYO MISE

Tsuruya Yoshinobu TOKYO MISE is a cafe located on the 1st floor of a department store called “Coredo Muromachi” directly connected to Mitsukoshimae Station. Tsuruya Yoshinobu is a well-known long-established Japanese traditional sweet brand in Kyoto. You can buy this high grade Wagashi at different department stores all over the country now. However, this café offer an artisan made beautiful high-grade confectioneries, called Namagashi. The café offers three different seasonal sweets options, and you can choose the one you like the most.

 

 

Since the artisans make the sweets on the spot, it is certainly fresh. You can take photos as well. Your eyes will be glued to the vivid hands of the artisans who create more and more sweets.

Related post: nerikiri, an edible art! beautiful high-grade traditional japanese confectionery

Matcha is served at the same time when your Namagashi is made. The bitterness from Matcha tea match really well with the sweetness from the freshly made Namagashi.

 

 

Tsuruya Yoshinobu, TOKYO MISE

Address: first floor of Nihonbashi COREDO Muromachi 3, 1-5-5, Nihonbashi Muromachi-cho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo
Access: Connected to Exit A6 of Mitsukoshimae Station on the Tokyo Metro Hanzomon Line/Ginza Lines
Menu: Matcha and Wagashi: 1,296 yen

 

2. Mori-no-Chashitsu

Mori-no-Chashitsu is a Matcha café located 7 min walk from Nishi Sugamo station. Once you enter, the café will greet you with bar-like counter with a very calm atmosphere. Here, you can enjoy both high grade regular Matcha, as well as Koicha, which is thick Matcha tea, together with Wagashi that are made by an owner of this café. Wagashi may change every day and you can enjoy seasonal taste.

Related post: thick matcha tea, koicha? matcha tea you didn’t know

 

 

 

In the back of the café, there is a room for tea ceremony where you can watch the owner making Matcha tea for you in a way of Japanese traditional tea ceremony, Sado. If you want to experiment Japanese Sado tradition to a full scale recommend you to visit this café!

 

 

Mori-no-Chashitsu

Address: 2-33-11, Nishi Sugamo, Toshima-ku, Tokyo
Access: 7 min walk from Nishi Sugamo station
Menu: Koicha: 1,500 yen

 

3. Toraya Tea Room, Tokyo Midtown

Toraya is a well-known Japanese-style sweet shop; it is known by essentially all Japanese people. It is particularly famous for Yōkan, and you can taste the delicious red bean that has just the right level of sweetness.

Related post: what is yokan? traditional japanese sweets that can be very arty

Toraya sweets can also be purchased at famous department stores and other places, but if you want to enjoy the sweets with Matcha green tea, the Toraya Tea Room is recommended. Especially at the Tokyo Midtown store in Roppongi Tokyo, beautiful Japanese sweets including Jo-Namagashi and others are displayed.

 

 

 

Here, not only you can have Wagashi that are made with red bean paste such as Namagashi and Manju, but also you can have Japanese style shaved ice. Don’t forget to order Matcha tea together!

 

 

Toraya Tea Room, Tokyo Midtown

Address: D-B117, 9-7-4 Akasaka, Minato-ku, TOKYO (Tokyo Midtown Galleria B1F)
Access: Directly connected from Exit 8 of Roppongi Station, Toei Subway Oedo Line

 
 

Please let me know how you like them if you visit!

Matane! (in Japanese, means “see you soon!”)

4 delicious Japanese Mochi sweets you must try!

4 delicious Japanese Mochi sweets you must try!

There are many types of Wagashi, Japanese traditional sweets and especially Mochi sweets are becoming more and more popular all over the world. But, if you are a beginner to Wagashi, what should you try first? Let me show you my recommendations. (☆Д☆)

 

1: Daifuku (大福)

Daifuku (aka Anko Mochi) is very popular Japanese sweets. It is a round Mochi ball that has red bean paste inside. You can enjoy chewy texture and rice flavor from Mochi and sweetness from red bean paste.

Related post: what is daifuku? perfect combination of mochi and red bean jam (anko)

There are many other types of Daifuku such as one has beans on outside Mochi layer. But, if you are new to Daifuku, I recommend you try Ichigo Daifuku (aka Strawberry Mochi) that has a whole strawberry inside together.

 

 

2: Dango (団子)

Dango is skewered Mochi balls that come with various sauces. Mochi balls are usually grilled and very chewy. Sometimes you can find Dango as a street snack and can have a freshly made Dango.

Related post: what is dango? the 5 most popular types of dango

Dango sauce can be anything from sweet to salty. But the most popular sauce is Mitarashi, which is thick sweet soy sauce similar to teriyaki sauce. It is sweet yet savory. I am sure you will love it!

 

 

3: Gyuhi (求肥)

Gyuhi is a very simple Mochi sweets, which is sweetened Mochi. To make Gyuhi, you just need to mix some sugar into plain Mochi and knead. By adding sugar, Mochi becomes even softer because sugar helps Mochi contain moisture. It is so soft, almost like melting in your mouth.

 

 

Gyuhi is delicious as it is but it is also used to make Nerikiri, which is a high-grade beautiful Japanese traditional sweet.

Related post: nerikiri, an edible art! beautiful high-grade traditional japanese confectionery

 

 

4: Mochi ice cream

Mochi ice cream is not a traditional Japanese sweet experience, but it has been getting more and more popular, so why not try it? Same as Daifuku, it is a round Mochi, but it has ice cream inside instead of red bean paste.

There is one very famous and popular Mochi ice cream in Japan, Yukimi Daifuku. The outside Mochi layer is so soft and there is vanilla ice cream inside. You can find this ice cream at convenience stores in Japan. If you have a chance, please try it!

 

 
 

Matane! (in Japanese, means “see you soon!”)

Nerikiri, an edible art! Beautiful high-grade traditional Japanese confectionery

Nerikiri, an edible art! Beautiful high-grade traditional Japanese confectionery

Have you ever seen showcases of beautiful traditional Japanese sweets in Japanese confectionery stores?w(*゚o゚*)w

 

 

What are they? How are they made?

 

Edible art! What is Nerikiri?

Nerikiri is a kind of bean-jam-based confectionery, and is categorized as “Jonamagashi”. Jonamagashi is a name given to the most artistic and high-grade pieces of Japanese confectionery.

 

 

In Japanese tea ceremony, Nerikiri is served together with Matcha especially with Koicha (thick Matcha tea).

Related post: thick matcha tea, koicha? matcha tea you didn’t know

 

How is Nerikiri made?

Nerikiri is actually 90% Anko, Japanese bean paste. The beautiful outside layer is made with Shiroan (white bean paste) mixed with sweet and soft Mochi (called Gyuhi), colored and finally shaped. By adding Gyuhi, it becomes easier to shape. Also Gyuhi adds smooth and a little bit of chewy texture to it. Typically, Koshian (smooth red bean paste) is added inside for taste.

Related post: what is japanese red bean paste, anko? types and how to eat at home

So, most of Nerikiri is Anko. You may be surprised that it is sweeter than other typical Japanese traditional sweets. But if you eat Nerikiri together with Matcha tea, Matcha tea clears the sweetness from Nerikiri, so they really well fitting delicious combination!

 

How Nerikiri is different from other sweets

As Nerikiri has evolved as part of Japanese tea ceremony, it entertains people with both its appearance and taste. Here are some characteristics of Nerikiri.

Each Nerikiri has its own name:
First, the word “Nerikiri” refers to all Nerikiris, and each Nerikiri has its own proper name. These proper names are given by Japanese confectionery craftspeople when they make a new kind of Nerikiri.

 

Nerikiri represents seasons:
Next, Nerikiri comes in various shapes, most of which represent seasons. Many of them resemble seasonal flowers, and there are also some that symbolize winter mountains or a piece of classical Japanese literature that suits the season.

 

Every Nerikiri is a once-in-a-lifetime experience:
Finally, Nerikiri never stays the same throughout the year. That is because Japanese confectionery craftspeople get inspired by the changing seasons and make a Nerikiri that suit the time. Therefore, every Nerikiri is a unique and an “Ichigoichie” (Japanese for ”once-in-a-lifetime“) experience.

Nerikiri lasts only 1-2 days so it is hard to buy it as a souvenir but if you visit Japan, please try it!

 
 

Matane! (in Japanese, means “see you soon!”)